Bennett Adelson Technical Blog

Bennett Adelson Technical Blog

A Lap Around the Azure API Management Service


At a recent conference, our team presented a talk called “A Lap Around Azure API Service Management.” It was a great opportunity to meet others in the area who are active developing on the Microsoft platform.  We appreciated meeting people with varying levels of familiarity in the Web APIs, and it was a perfect opportunity to exchange ideas and experiences.

For people who are new to this space, the presentation covered the Web API ecosystem as well as their value in building modern applications.

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From a Web API user’s perspective, there is a wide range of functionality that they expose, including security, caching, logging, tracing, storage, etc.  If you’re building an app, changes are there is already an existing API that will fit your needs.

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In addition to pre-built APIs, there is a large, vibrant developer community who are creating and consuming these APIs.  Your company may be able to connect with new customers and new revenue channels by creating your own APIs and working with this community to connect your services in these developers’ applications.

At a high level, the Windows Azure API Management Service (AMS) has four feature sets:

· API Management via the Admin portal

· Admin Portal – manage your APIs

· Proxy – hosting public version of your APIs

· Developer portal – helps developers discover your APIs and promotes adoption

· Analytics – provides insight into usage and the health of your APIs

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Publisher/Admin Portal:

Also called the API Management Console, this is where API publishers configure and manage their public APIs.

In AMS, a product contains one or more APIs as well as a usage quota and the terms of use. Once a product is published, developers can subscribe to the product and begin to use the product’s APIs.

The screenshot below shows some of the various types of products that can be created with the management console.  Here, each product represents a tier of service. API publishers can use the AMS product configuration feature to provide different levels of service using call rates, subscriptions requiring approvals, etc.

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Proxy:

The AMS Proxy is the middleware that glues the published APIs to an actual implementation. It uses the information provided when importing an API to invoke this “backend” API in response to someone calls the AMS-published API. The proxy is very useful because not only does it isolate the backend API but it also allow the pre and post processing of messages through policies.

 

Developer Portal:

The developer portal is where developers can learn about the publisher’s APIs, view and call operations, and subscribe to products. Prospective customers can visit the developer portal, view APIs and operations, and sign up. The URL for the developer portal is located on the dashboard in the Azure portal for the API Management service instance.  API publishers can customize the look and feel of their developer portal by adding custom content, customizing styles, etc.  Features like the developer portal, alongside the product and subscriber management, can help developers accelerate the adoption of their APIs.

 

Analytics:

The Analytics features provide insight into your API platform. Usage data like successful/blocked/failed calls are reported on a per-user, per product and per API level. There are several charts and tables that allow you to quickly understand how your APIs are operating.  The Analytics features can help providers track API usage and identify performance issues, should these arise.

In addition to these features, the portal also provides a mechanism for policy management.  Using this feature, administrators can easily create policies that can control several facets of the API, such as quotas, payload transformation, etc.  Below is an example of a policy that limits the rate of calls to the API to a maximum of three calls every 60 seconds:

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If you would like to learn more about the Azure Management Service and Web API development, please feel free to contact us at Bennett Adelson.  Also, the links below can help provide more information:

http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/api-management-get-started/

http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2014/DEV-B382

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